Yellow Book Gardens 1 – Bury Court Farmhouse

Our first National Garden Scheme’s Yellow Book garden of 2015 was to Bury Court Farmhouse in the Herefordshire village of Wigmore. We always look forward to our visits to other gardens which open to the public under the auspices of the NGS because of course we open for the Yellow Book too. We were particularly keen to see what other gardens looked like in April as our first opening this year is on 16th April.

To celebrate our first NGS garden of the year the sun came out and the temperature shot up to 17 degrees way above anything we have so far experienced in 2015. We drove down through the beautiful Shropshire Hills and into Herefordshire a county with such beautiful villages among beautiful countryside. We were directed into a rough grassed car park riddled with muddy puddles. We had to seek out a space for our car among dead farm machinery slowly decaying and being taken over by Mother Nature. A cheerful welcome awaited us at the garden gate. Spot the horse shoe hanging from the NGS sign.

2015 04 05_0370

We passed through a five barred gate into a courtyard with narrow borders around its perimeter and a rectangular bed in the centre all planted with cheerful spring bulbs and early flowering perennials and shrubs. Hyacinths, Vincas, Celandines, Doffodils and Tulips.

2015 04 05_0371 2015 04 05_0372 2015 04 05_0373 2015 04 05_0374

We were amused by the owl family and the bird bath.

2015 04 05_0375 2015 04 05_0376

The garden boasted a small productive patch with leeks and broad beans already growing well and cloches warming up soil for future crops. A lawned area alongside was bordered by a tall hedge which allowed woodland plants to grow in its shade.

2015 04 05_0377 2015 04 05_0378 2015 04 05_0379 2015 04 05_0380 2015 04 05_0381 2015 04 05_0382 2015 04 05_0383

At the front of the house was a large sunny lawn with island beds full of brightly coloured spring flowering plants. Primroses, Primulas and bulbs especially Hyacinths and Narcissi.

2015 04 05_0385 2015 04 05_0386

This beautiful bronze statue of a hare was basking in the sunshine among blue Anemones.

2015 04 05_0387

The borders around this sunny lawn were truly mixed borders with herbaceous planting, shrubs and trees giving interest at every level.

2015 04 05_0388 2015 04 05_0389 2015 04 05_0390 2015 04 05_0391 2015 04 05_0395 2015 04 05_0396 2015 04 05_0397 2015 04 05_0400 2015 04 05_0404 2015 04 05_0405 2015 04 05_0406

Right in the centre of this lawned area was a clue to the original use of the imposing stone built building in the centre of the garden. It had originally been a farm growing apples to make cider. The photos below show the mill stone that would have been used to crush the cider apples. Ponies were used to pull the stones around a groove.

2015 04 05_0409 2015 04 05_0410  2015 04 05_0412

2015 04 05_0413 2015 04 05_0414 2015 04 05_0415 2015 04 05_0416 2015 04 05_0392_edited-1 2015 04 05_0411

So our first Yellow Book garden of 2015 was certainly worth a visit with its cheerful planting and it served very nice tea and cakes!

 

 

About greenbenchramblings

A retired primary school head teacher, I now spend much of my time gardening in our quarter acre plot in rural Shropshire south of Shrewsbury. I share my garden with Jude my wife a newly retired teacher , eight assorted chickens and a plethora of wildlife. Jude does all the heavy work as I have a damaged spine and right leg. We also garden on an allotment nearby. We are interested in all things related to gardens, green issues and wildlife.
This entry was posted in colours, flowering bulbs, garden design, garden photography, gardens, grow your own, hardy perennials, ornamental trees and shrubs, spring bulbs, spring gardening, The National Gardening Scheme", trees, Yellow Book Gardens and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Yellow Book Gardens 1 – Bury Court Farmhouse

  1. What a wonderful tour – it was all stunning but I got stuck on the owl. Oh my gosh, that is so unusual. 🙂

  2. There is quite a large range of those owl sculptures available in the UK but we had never seen that one before. Good to have humour in the garden.
    Malc

Comments are closed.