An Artist’s Back Garden

I often write and share my photos of gardens open to the public, often large and under the auspices of the National Trust or affiliated to the Royal Horticultural Society or smaller and open under the Yellow Book (NGS) scheme. Recently I wrote about a small garden owned by our friend and fellow Hardy Plant Society member Anne, in a post simply called “Anne’s Garden”. I shall be writing more about such gardens in this occasional series of posts of which this is the second.

We spent a few days down in Surrey in April staying in the lovely town of Farnham where my brother, Graham and his wife Vicky live. We re-visited that great garden, Nymans and it was good to see it at a different at a different time of year. We enjoyed a walk on “The Downs” for the first time ever and a walk around the old town of Farnham for the first time in decades.

But breakfast outside on an unusually warm spring morning in Graham and Vicky’s garden made me collect my camera as the light was so good. The sun was low in the sky so lit up the tiniest detail and the gentlest textures. Come with me and look through the lens of my trusty Nikon as we look around this artist’s garden.

One step out of the side door and immediately we have a clue as to what to expect.

2014 04 23_8658 2014 04 23_8661

The first view of the back garden shows how long and thin it is and how beautifully planted, and a look down the garden also finds Jude the Undergardener and my brother Graham enjoying breakfast in the sun.

2014 04 23_8663 2014 04 23_8676

2014 04 23_8734

Sculptural pieces are found within the borders and look natural alongside the plants snuggling up to them.

2014 04 23_8665 2014 04 23_8666

Effective plant combinations are a strength of this garden, where foliage plays a key role.

2014 04 23_8667 2014 04 23_8673

2014 04 23_8672  2014 04 23_8674

2014 04 23_8702 2014 04 23_8713

But specimen plants stand out and make you stop for a second closer look.

2014 04 23_8659 2014 04 23_8668

2014 04 23_8670 2014 04 23_8671

2014 04 23_8669 2014 04 23_8681

2014 04 23_8695 2014 04 23_8696

2014 04 23_8710

Containers of all shapes and sizes and made from all sorts of materials add more interest.

2014 04 23_8664 2014 04 23_8677

2014 04 23_8678 2014 04 23_8679

2014 04 23_8700 2014 04 23_8714

2014 04 23_8735

Early morning is definitely the time for shadows.

2014 04 23_8675

Close to the house the shady border is full of promise with new growth breaking through the soil with the ferns looking particularly dramatic.

2014 04 23_8684 2014 04 23_8685 2014 04 23_8686 2014 04 23_8712

2014 04 23_8737

An artist’s garden has to be full of interesting objects and happenings.

2014 04 23_8688 2014 04 23_8690 2014 04 23_8691 2014 04 23_8692    2014 04 23_8697 2014 04 23_8708

2014 04 23_8698 2014 04 23_8699  2014 04 23_8701 2014 04 23_8704

2014 04 23_8706 2014 04 23_8707

2014 04 23_8715 2014 04 23_8736

An artist must have a studio and what better place for it but at the bottom of the garden! Close by is a closely planted group of Mountain Ash, sown by birds – a great feature which I have never seen before. Well done the birds!

2014 04 23_8703 2014 04 23_8723

2014 04 23_8729 2014 04 23_8730

But one thing that no gardener wants in the garden is snails and this garden is full of them! On the plants, climbing the fences, the house walls and even climbing up the window panes. They are everywhere!

2014 04 23_8717 2014 04 23_8716

So we shall finish off this look at Graham and Vicky’s garden with a few shots of the front garden, the last shot showing Graham kindly digging up a plant for us to take home for our own garden.

2014 04 23_8745 2014 04 23_8746  2014 04 23_8747  2014 04 23_8744

The next post in this occasional series about our friends’ gardens will feature a woodland garden of friends Pauline and Derek.

About greenbenchramblings

A retired primary school head teacher, I now spend much of my time gardening in our quarter acre plot in rural Shropshire south of Shrewsbury. I share my garden with Jude my wife a newly retired teacher , eight assorted chickens and a plethora of wildlife. Jude does all the heavy work as I have a damaged spine and right leg. We also garden on an allotment nearby. We are interested in all things related to gardens, green issues and wildlife.
This entry was posted in colours, flowering bulbs, garden buildings, garden design, garden photography, garden seating, gardening, hardy perennials, ornamental trees and shrubs, outdoor sculpture, recycling, sculpture, spring bulbs, spring gardening, town gardens, trees, water in the garden and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to An Artist’s Back Garden

  1. graham mollart says:

    Thank you Malcolm. It is so good to see our patch through fresh eyes. Facing north east we get a lot of cold winter shade but this beautiful morning light highlighting the colour of leaves and petals as the sun shines through them for much of the year. Thanks again, Graham and Vicky.

  2. I love looking at other peoples’ gardens.

Comments are closed.