Three Welsh Gardens – Part One -Tan y Llyn – a little nursery in a woodland garden.

We ventured along narrow winding lanes into the countryside of Powys our neighbouring county across the border into Wales. We were not the only ones out travelling these lanes on a mission on this sunny afternoon. Several members of the Shrewsbury Mini-Group, part of the Shropshire Group of the Hardy Plant Society, were meeting up at a woodland garden and nursery called Tan y Llyn.

2014 05 31_9925 2014 05 31_9906

2014 05 31_9914 2014 05 31_9915

2014 05 31_9931

The weather was bright. There is no better day to visit a woodland garden than a sunny one as it enhances the contrast between shade and light so well. Even the most ordinary plants such as this Cotoneaster and Yew look so good.

2014 05 31_9903 2014 05 31_9904

Any flowers in a woodland garden shine out from the shadows.

2014 05 31_9905  2014 05 31_9907 2014 05 31_9908 2014 05 31_9909 2014 05 31_99392014 05 31_9910 2014 05 31_9919 2014 05 31_9950

2014 05 31_9951 2014 05 31_9935

Dotted around Tan y Llyn are interesting objects and well-composed cameos.

2014 05 31_9911 2014 05 31_9912 2014 05 31_9913

2014 05 31_9928 2014 05 31_9929

2014 05 31_9949 2014 05 31_9937

Callum Johnston the garden owner also ran a little nursery specialising in alpines and herbs and he featured many of the plants for sale within a garden around his front door where plants were grown in a selection of pots and containers. They invited close inspection as did the sales benches close by in the shade of deciduous trees.

2014 05 31_9916 2014 05 31_9917

We were particularly drawn to this dry river bed of pebbles winding through the gravel of the driveway near the cottage’s front door. We immediately began to plan where we could try something similar out at home.

2014 05 31_9918

Callum admitted to an obsession – training, twisting and pruning willow into interesting structures. He also obviously loved hedge trimming where on occasion he lets his imagination run riot.

2014 05 31_9924 2014 05 31_9923 2014 05 31_99522014 05 31_9930 2014 05 31_9953

Callum had even trained willows to become bird feeding stations. The birds certainly liked them as did our Hardy Plant friends. Callum and his partner Brenda served us up with cream teas under the shade of trees alongside these feeders so as we reveled in our luxury teas we were entertained by the birds enjoying theirs.

2014 05 31_9920 2014 05 31_9921

Nearby herbs grew in a terraced border and added their scent and spice to the conducive atmosphere. As with many garden owners who like to share their garden, Callum and Brenda knew how to make us feel comfortable and relaxed.

2014 05 31_9922

2014 05 31_9926 2014 05 31_9927     2014 05 31_9932

A classic colour combination of yellow and blue attracted us. Closer to we realised that the yellow was provided by this stunning Lily.

2014 05 31_9933 2014 05 31_9934

 

One effective design trick used here was the use of enticing paths and it was very well used.

2014 05 31_9943 2014 05 31_9946 2014 05 31_9945

2014 05 31_9948 2014 05 31_9941

A final wander around these paths beneath and between the trees was called for after our tea and before we reluctantly left this special place in a wooded Welsh valley.

2014 05 31_9936  2014 05 31_9938  2014 05 31_9940  2014 05 31_9942  2014 05 31_9944   2014 05 31_9947

Callum  accompanied us down the drive as he thanked us for visiting and for buying lots of plants. They were very good hosts. At the bottom of the drive we made one final discovery, another surprise conjured up by this truly unique garden. Another of Callum’s tricks with his pruners.

2014 05 31_9954

About greenbenchramblings

A retired primary school head teacher, I now spend much of my time gardening in our quarter acre plot in rural Shropshire south of Shrewsbury. I share my garden with Jude my wife a newly retired teacher , eight assorted chickens and a plethora of wildlife. Jude does all the heavy work as I have a damaged spine and right leg. We also garden on an allotment nearby. We are interested in all things related to gardens, green issues and wildlife.
This entry was posted in climbing plants, garden buildings, garden design, garden photography, gardening, gardens, gardens open to the public, hardy perennials, Hardy Plant Society, Land Art, National Garden Scheme, NGS, nurseries, ornamental trees and shrubs, outdoor sculpture, Powis, Powys, trees, Wales, woodland and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Three Welsh Gardens – Part One -Tan y Llyn – a little nursery in a woodland garden.

  1. pbmgarden says:

    Nice ideas for paths.

  2. I know I say this repeatedly, but I do love walking through your garden and looking everything; I really enjoy the photos.

  3. graham mollart says:

    Wow! This has to be one of my favourite gardens you’ve shown us so far. Where in Powys is it exactly , does it open regularly, or were you honoured guests?

Comments are closed.