Miserden Park, a Gloucestershire Garden

We were journeying south towards Hampshire and searched for a place to break our journey. We were pleased to discover Miserden Park was close to the road we travelled. We expected it to be easy to find as we knew which village it was on the outskirts of but poor signage directing us firstly to the village and then to the garden itself made it difficult.

When we saw the house at Miserden we were impressed with the way the gardens around it helped it sit so comfortably in the landscape. The pale blue planting looked so good with the pale limestone of the building.

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We soon realised that this was one of those gardens which impressed with the tiny details of individual plants and colour combinations but also with the bigger pictures it presented.

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Metalwork impressed us from the imposing gates to the intimate seats.

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We loved the contrast between the formal gardens and the wilder “Robinsonian” areas. Paths mown through the long grass in these wilder areas led us to surprise plants to appreciate such as this Aesculus.

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On the paved area which surrounded the house containers planted up with gently coloured plants enhanced the colour of the stonework.

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An unusual rill garden had been created to celebrate the Millenium and a nearby conveniently positioned summer house gives visitors a good chance to rest awhile and admire it.

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A shrub border full of deep purple leaves provided a rest for the eyes after studying brighter coloured plantings.

 

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The grey stone walls of local limestone were a perfect foil for gentle coloured roses.

 

 

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One area had been developed much more recently and afforded impressive contrasts of style.

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We couldn’t really work out what this strange stonework integrated into the base of an ancient tree was all about.

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We finished our tour of the gardens at Miserden with a long slow walk along the double herbaceous borders.

 

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It is always a bonus to visit a good garden when taking a break in a journey further afield. Miserden was well worth stopping to explore.

About greenbenchramblings

A retired primary school head teacher, I now spend much of my time gardening in our quarter acre plot in rural Shropshire south of Shrewsbury. I share my garden with Jude my wife a newly retired teacher , eight assorted chickens and a plethora of wildlife. Jude does all the heavy work as I have a damaged spine and right leg. We also garden on an allotment nearby. We are interested in all things related to gardens, green issues and wildlife.
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2 Responses to Miserden Park, a Gloucestershire Garden

  1. Lovely. The stonework and the seating arrangements are gorgeous. Green backdrop wall is amazing. 😦

  2. pbmgarden says:

    Well this is fabulous, especially the herbaceous borders.

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