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architecture buildings community gardening the sea the seaside the shore the South

Southwold – a seaside town with added flair!

Southwold has been recommended to us as a seaside place worth a visit a few times so when we found ourselves just 20 or so miles away we simply had to go and see what made Southwold so special.

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We parked the car right in front of the pier as a suitable parking space presented itself and on opening the doors we were greeted by the sound of the song “The Good Ship Lollipop” being broadcast rather too loudly! This was to be the first of several surprises to come!

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The pier was full of such surprises none more impressive than the metalwork pieces along its length beginning appropriately with the gateway. To follow were seat arms of metal eels, two rather “Heath Robinsonesque” creations, a clock and a telescope.

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On the back wall of the main entrance building this huge mural is a tribute to writer George Orwell to whom Southwold was home during various periods of his life. Liz Ewing describes Southwold as “…… a place he returned to time and time again,to study, to work, to write, to paint, to fall in love and to convalesce”.

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Walking the promenade afforded wide sweeping views of long sandy beaches and looking out to sea the rather beautiful sculptural village of wind turbines.

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From the end of the pier we spotted another favourite seaside feature, a row of beach huts, for which Southwold is famous, but this is the subject of another post all about the seaside at Southwold (published 22\11\2016) . Here are a couple to whet your appetite!

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Back to search for other aspects of this interesting little seaside town that is Southwold, we wandered very slowly away from the pier towards the old town itself.

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Leaving the bright plastic of beach toys behind us we discovered these interesting little garden cameos with nautical hints, and also an inland lighthouse of all things. This strange and extremely tall building was hundreds of yards from the sea itself and hidden in the back gardens of the village cottages. Strange! You will spot it snuggled into the town centre in one of my pics below.

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After being surprised by the beauty of the pier and the beach huts were then delighted to find an equally beautiful little town.

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It appears that at one time in the past Southwold was a busy productive little settlement with its own brewery, distillery and cottage industries. Today the brewery remains integrated into the village with its premises nestled among the shops and cottages.

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There was obvious pride in this lovely little place with community spirit riding high and a very warm welcome for its visitors.

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We left the inland secrets of Southwold behind and ambled back along the promenade looking out over the beach and the sea itself, a perfect end to a day of finding a new favourite place. A great discovery!

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architecture buildings colours

Southwold – Beach Hut Special

In this blog I will celebrate to the unique beauty and eccentric natures of the great British beach hut. Southwold situated on the Suffolk coast overlooking the North Sea is rightly famous for its huts, having a style of hut named after it and having a couple of rows adding up to a few hundred brightly coloured little “homes-from-homes”.

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The Southwold style of beach huts has a tiny veranda with wooden balustrading along their frontage. some owners now enclose the balustrade with wooden panels too.

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Let us now enjoy the colours, patterns and quirkiness of the Southwold beach huts and spot the owners’ characters as we go along!

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buildings colours photography the sea the seaside the shore

Hampshire Seaside – part two – Milford

To bring some sunshine to a very dull January let us turn the clock back and enjoy a visit to the Hampshire coast.

While in Hampshire we drove down through the New forest avoiding cattle, donkeys, pigs and ponies on the road and down to Milford on Sea.

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Just like Lymington this small seaside town overlooked the famous stretch of water, the Solent and beyond the Solent we had views of the Isle of Wight. Frequent ferries trundled passengers and vehicles over to the island and back. The Solent as expected was busy with yachts and launches.

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The cliffs here defied any sense of scale. In the photos below the cliffs look as tall as any along the south coast, but in reality were merely 12 ft or so in height.

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Whenever we visit the sea we look out for beach huts as they are so colourful, so full of character and a close look reveals interesting details of colour and texture. So we were delighted to come cross a small street of them at the end of our beach promenade.

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As usual when we find them my camera worked hard to capture their spirit. I hope you enjoy my little gallery dedicated to them. As usual click on the first pic and then navigate with the arrows.

 

 

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photography the sea the seaside the South

Go South 3. Beach huts and boats.

Beach huts and boats. Now that is my kind of seaside village! Driving towards Dungeness we stopped off at Littlestone-on-sea where we spotted these favourite features. It was spitting with rain and heavily overcast as we set out on our wander along the shingle beach, camera in hand.

When we reached the patch where the beach huts and boats lived we were saddened to realise that what we saw was in fact the remnants of a fishing industry now largely  gone. The boats were full of fishing debris and what looked like beach huts from a distance were the old storage sheds for fishing gear. They had been spruced up with colourful paint but at least they were still used for storage.

In the gloomy light, the brightly painted huts glowed and invited a closer look. The decorators had been enjoying themselves letting their imaginations flow. Once again I moved in close in search of patterns and textures in addition to the more obvious blazes of colour.

Some hut owners had added words of wisdom, fancy numbers and names.

Our slow exploration of the huts and fishing debris came to a sudden end as the rain turned heavy and the wind speeded up uncomfortably. But a few things did tempt me to stop and shoot off a few more photos.

We arrived back at the car somewhat sodden and extremely windswept, hoping that we could dry out using the car heater. We drove on down the coast road towards one of our favourite places anywhere, Dungeness. We have visited the mysterious world of Dungeness with its wild and exposed expanses of shingle several times before but its special magical atmosphere still entices us back.

So, Go South 4 should be all about Dungeness but it didn’t quite work out like that.